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You are here: Home » The Marketing Diary » The Different Marketing Approach » Email Marketing Brings In $15.50 per Dollar

March 9, 2005

Email Marketing Brings In $15.50 per Dollar

MarketingSherpa.com reports:

"That $15.50 per email-marketing dollar spent is roughly 17% more than in direct-mail campaigns and 73% more than telemarketing campaigns, according to a new study from the Winterberry Group, a New York-based research and consulting group.

Winterberry also predicts that email sales will go up to $16.70 per dollar in the coming year, compared to $14.60 generated per DM dollar, and $9.71 in sales per telemarketing-campaign dollar.

While my faith in most research stats is less than firm, this study does make a definitive point: e-mail marketing still works and at least "in concept" provides a positive ROI.

Also, my own experience from the US and Central and Eastern European markets proves this point as well, as do the conversations I had with e-mail marketers while attending the International Direct Marketing Fair.

Yes, e-mail is still alive and it still works.

But, that does not change the fact that e-mail is difficult to deliver, and that in most cases it actually does not get delivered. Let's not forget that on the average, 64.7% of the business e-mail you send is not even opened, let alone read, according to DoubleClick.

As a content publisher, I certainly want all of my readers to receive my content. And the same goes for my customers: I want to be absolutely certain that they do receive the important content intended for them. With e-mail, I just can't be sure. RSS is the perfect tool to make this happen.

This brings us to a strange situation where e-mail still generates a great ROI, but RSS is the tool that "gets content delivered". The only sensible way out of this dillema is to use both, hand-in-hand.

Comments

I stopped using "normal" eMail autoresponders this month and switched to RSS eMail which gives me 100% dependable delivery.

RSS and eMail go together exceptionally well as I have found out during the past couple of months.

It's fairly easy to educate a novice how to get your RSS eMail too.

While RSS is not mainstream yet (but may become so very soon with the new internet explorer and other browsers) there is an excellent RSS eMail
Autoresponder available now that does everything you expect from an email autoresonder, PLUS delivers 100% of your eMail messages.

Who knows, you may decide to quit using your old eMail autoresponder.

Check it out at http://www.rss-email-autoresponder.com

Posted by: Larry Parsons at March 22, 2005 2:49 AM
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